Course Syllabus

Here are the official course syllabi for SF2719 and SF2725.

The preliminary course planning shows lecture by lecture what I will take up.

Examination

Examination of the course is by a final exam and continuous examination during the course.

The final exam consists of three parts:

  • Part A contains six questions about mathematicians and their contributions, historical periods, and developments of mathematical ideas. This knowledge is acquired through lectures and reading of literature.
  • Part B consists of an analysis of a historical mathematical text with respect to one or more questions and has the form of an essay. This knowledge is acquired through lectures, writing of essays and peer review during the course as well as group work with mathematical texts.
  • Part C consists of several discussion questions, of which the student has to choose one to write an essay on. The questions are about a claim that should be argued for or against, based on historical knowledge, or the sketching of a mathematical development. This knowledge is acquired through the writing of essays, feedback during the course, discussions, and role play.

Every part gives up to 12 points. To pass the course, one needs at least 4 point on every part. Moreover, the minimum points for each grade are:

  • E: at least 18 points
  • D: at least 21 points
  • C: at least 24 points
  • B: at least 27 points, of which at least 8 on part B and at least 8 on part C
  • A: at least 30 points, of which at least 10 on part B and at least 10 on part C.

Students achieving at least 4 points on every part, but only 16 or 17 points in total, obtain the grade Fx with the possibility of completion to grade E.

The final exam is 5 hours long (but you may need much less time if you have bonus points). It is in English but you may write your answers in Swedish if you so wish. You may bring an English-Swedish and/or Swedish-English dictionary to the exam. No other aids are allowed.

During the course, bonus points to the exam can be obtained:

  • Four short written in-class quizzes on historical knowledge can replace 4 of the 6 questions of part A and give up to 8 bonus points.
  • Two essays (number 1 and 3) can give up to 6 bonus points to part B on the exam. These are added to the points achieved on part B of the exam.
  • Two essays (number 2 and 4) can give up to 12 points. These essays can replace part C of the exam, but are not added to the points achieved on part C.

For details on who the bonus points of the essays are awarded and what the essays are about, check the Assigments section.

It is possible to replace the exam completely by bonus points, but for the higher grades (A and B) it is necessary to write at least part B of the exam.

For the course SF2725, you also need to submit an extended essay which requires more substantial, independent, and original work than the course essays. Your final grade will be the weighted average of 25% extended essay, 75% course work/exam.

Previous exams

NB: The course was structured in a different way in 2017, without bonus points, so there are differences in the structure of the exams (in particular in part A). The exams from 2017 are in Swedish only.

Grade criteria

In the course SF2719:

For grade E, a student must be able to:

  • in broad strokes, sketch the development through history of some mathematical ideas, mathematical subjects, and frameworks in which mathematics was done;
  • in broad strokes, sketch important contributions, biographies and the social context of some prominent historical mathematicians;
  • read and understand some aspects of a historical mathematical text and write a coherent analysis of such a text, addressing questions about its content or context.

For grade C, a student must be able to:

  • with some precision, sketch the development through history of several mathematical ideas, mathematical subjects, and frameworks in which mathematics was done;
  • with some precision, sketch important contributions, biographies and the social context of several prominent historical mathematicians;
  • read and understand the main points of a historical mathematical text and write a well-structured analysis of such a text, addressing questions about its content or context
  • come up with relevant historical questions based on the reading of a text
  • discuss in written form controversial claims, arguing based on historical knowledge.

For grade A, a student must be able to:

  • with authority and precision, sketch the development through history of several mathematical ideas, mathematical subjects, and frameworks in which mathematics was done;
  • with authority and precision, sketch important contributions, biographies and the social context of several prominent historical mathematicians;
  • read and understand a historical mathematical text in its entirety and write a well-structured analysis of such a text, addressing questions about its content or context;
  • come up with relevant and creative historical and societal questions based on the reading of a text
  • discuss in written form controversial claims, arguing with precision based on historical knowledge, with good structure and a logical and easy to follow train of thought.

Grades D and B are awarded when the requirements of grades C resp. A are fulfilled to a certain degree, but not fully.

In the course SF2725:

In addition to the above, a student must be able to write a longer historical text which requires literature search and a combination of the abilities mentioned above. 

Course analysis

Here is the course analysis for the course given in 2018.

For students with disabilities

Students with disabilities can obtain additional support. This may include changes in the examination.
KTH has coordinators for students with disabilities, Funka,  who deal with issues relating to functional disabilities. You should turn to Funka at funka@kth.se for information about support. 
Compensatory support for in-class quizzes is limited. Similarily, extended time for essay-writing cannot be granted as this would obstruct the peer review and rebuttal module.  If, due to a disability, you cannot demonstrate your learning in quizzes or essays (the continuous examination) in a way comparable to a student without disabilities, you may have the right to additional writing time or other support at the final exam, which allows you to make up for any shortcomings in the continuous examination.
Do not hesitate to contact me if you require a discussion of your individual needs.

 

Course Summary:

Date Details